instrument selection guide

Clarinet

The clarinet is a cylindrical-bore pipe with a mouthpiece that resembles a beak and uses a single cane reed. The lower end flares out into a bell. Because it has a range of more than three octaves, it can produce both very low and very high notes. Available in plastic.

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The flute is a musical instrument of the woodwind family. Unlike woodwind instruments with reeds, a flute is an aerophone or reedless wind instrument that produces its sound from the flow of air across an opening.

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Trumpet

The trumpet is the highest of the brass wind instruments, composed of a long metal tube looped once and ending in a flared bell. The pressure and shape of the lips in the mouthpiece and the strength of the air pressure, used in combination with the valves, determine the pitch produced. Brass lacquer.

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Violin

The violin is the smallest of the four types of stringed instruments in an orchestra, and additional sizes are available under "Choose from All Instruments" at top. It is also the highest sounding instrument of the string family. The term violin means "little viola" in Italian. It has four strings and is played by placing the instrument under one's chin and drawing the bow, made of horsehair, across the strings.

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Saxophone

The saxophone is a single reed instrument that has its place in everything from pop and big band to jazz and classical. Depending on the player, it can sound mellow or strong. The Eb Alto Saxophone, the 2nd highest pitched saxophone was made popular by performers such as Charlie Parker and Nat “Cannonball” Adderley.

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Trombone

For some reason, the trombone is not nearly as popular as the trumpet or clarinet so its players are considered very valuable assets by band teachers.The trombone is a member of the brass family that plays the important bass parts of the music. As with all brass instruments, the sound is produced by buzzing the lips into a mouthpiece. A unique feature of the trombone is the slide. While other brass instruments change pitches by pressing valves to change the length of the air flow, the trombone player simply moves the slide in and out to change the length of the instrument. The trombone is played in bands (such as a marching band), symphony orchestras, jazz groups, brass quintets and as solo instruments It is stored in its case in two pieces.

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Other

Now that you have reviewed the most popular instruments in our selection guide, there are other instruments that are available for students to play. Often, because these are not as popular there is a greater demand by teachers for students who are willing or interested in playing them.

Below is a list of other instruments that are available for your child to play:

  • Brass Instruments: French Horn, Euphonium, Cornet, and Trombone with F attachment
  • Woodwinds: Oboe, Tenor Saxophone, Piccolo
Rent one of these instruments now!